Seven Surprising Things About New Zealand

Seven Surprising Things About New Zealand

sobel Benesch moved to New Zealand from the United States with her young family.

Here she describes the cultural differences between the two countries and why she loves it here.

We are so used to the mantra “no shirts, no shoes, no service” that when we saw people walk into grocery stores and restaurants without shoes on, we were completely flabbergasted.

I remember being kicked out of Costco in the States because one of my children didn’t have shoes on his feet and they were concerned that there might be glass somewhere on the ground.

We are so used to the mantra “no shirts, no shoes, no service” that when we saw people walk into grocery stores and restaurants without shoes on, we were completely flabbergasted.

I remember being kicked out of Costco in the States because one of my children didn’t have shoes on his feet and they were concerned that there might be glass somewhere on the ground.

We were completely confused when people used aubergine for eggplant, capsicum for bell pepper, togs for swim suit, jandals for flip flops, and chips for French fries.

Tourists in the States are treated with varying degrees of hospitality so despite the fact that I am technically a Kiwi (as both my parents were born and raised here), my husband and I were a little nervous about how receptive New Zealanders would be about outsiders moving into their paradise.

Instead of a “go back home” attitude, people welcomed us with open arms, even telling us “welcome home” on more than one occasion.